Jul. 12th, 2017

We drove over to Madison on Saturday, July 8th, for the beginning of this year’s Madison Early Music Festival. This year’s theme is “Quixotic Musical Treasures from the Golden Age of Spain” which in particular celebrates Miguel de Cervantes, and his novel Don Quixote, but also the other authors, poets, and musicians of that productive era.

The opening night concert was titled “The Musical World of Don Quixote.” Numerous pieces and types of music were referred to by Cervantes in his story, and the concert took us through events of the novel with examples of the types of music that might have been played, and that were thematically appropriate to the story.

Piffaro, the Renaissance Band, lead the concert, joined by members of the Rose Ensemble, Andrew Rader, Bradley King, Jordan Sramek, and Jake Endres; as well as soprano Nell Snaidas, and additional instrumentalists Erick Schmalz, Glen Velez, and Charles Weaver on sackbut, percussion, and vihuela and guitar, respectively. The Piffaro contingent consisted of Grant Herreid, Priscilla Herreid, Greg Ingles, Joan Kimball, Christa Patton, and Bob Weimken.

Various members of the Rose Ensemble embodied Don Quixote on vocals, depending upon the voice the piece was written for; Ms. Snaidas sang all the female parts, and put her operatic background to good use in expression and gesture.

This was a really fascinating concert, extremely well performed and very well put together. Mr. Herreid, who “conceived and curated” the program gave an interesting pre-concert lecture on how the various works performed were found and decided on.

The pre-concert lecture on Sunday night, by Peggy Murray, on historical reproduction of dance, was unfortunately cut short by technical difficulties. However, the concert, a solo performance by Xavier Diaz-Latorre, was mostly flawless. The stage lighting was on the dim side, and Mr. Diaz-Latorre’s voice did not carry well to the upper seats where we were. Nevertheless, the music was amazing. The vihuela is an instrument shaped like a small guitar, but strung and tuned like a lute. The first half of the program, played on the five-course vihuela, was mostly soft, sweet, and introspective, although the pieces played had an intricacy that called for and received intense focus.

The six-course vihuela, used in the second half, is a transitional instrument, which can be strummed as well as plucked—sometimes at the same time, as happened in the first piece, “Poema harmonico,” by Francisco Guerau. This set was faster and more fiery, which built to a conclusion lauded by a universal standing ovation, and two encores.
Early Sunday, we enjoyably killed some time by going to see Despicable Me 3.

In this outing, Gru (Steve Carell) and Lucy (Kristen Wiig) are both working for the Anti-Villain League, trying to take down ‘80’s themed supervillain Balthasar Bratt (Trey Parker). Bratt had a TV show in which he played “Evill Bratt” (yes, spelled that way) in the 1980’s which was canceled when he hit puberty and wasn’t cute any longer. Now he’s taking it out on society and general and Hollywood in particular by committing crimes base on his old show. Bratt continues to evade capture, although Gru has foiled his theft attempts. This isn’t good enough for the new AVL director Valerie da Vinci, who gives Gru and Lucy the sack.

Things are rather dark for Gru: with no job, he’s resisting the call of villainy, which causes the Minions to abandon him. Then, he finds that he has a long-lost twin brother, Dru (also voiced by Carell).

Dru is well-off, having inherited a pig-farming business from the father Gru had thought dead. Dear Old Dad, it turns out, was also a villain, and Dru wants Gru to teach him the ropes so he can carry on the family tradition.

This is of course a troubling prospect for Gru, although it does give him a chance to strike back at Bratt. Meanwhile, Lucy is working on being a Mom to the girls, with mixed results. How all this works out is of course very funny, and a visual delight with all the over-the-top gadgets. The 80’s references are fun to catch.

A must-see if you have been following the series.
On Tuesday, July 11th, we drove to West Bend to see the Museum of Wisconsin Art. The Museum itself is a striking new wedge-shaped building near downtown, which incorporates studio and meeting spaces, as well as a modestly –sized gallery area.

We were drawn particularly by The Roddis Collection: American Style and Spirit. This exhibit consists of women’s clothing dating from the Civil war to the late 20th century, all of which belonged to one family and was preserved in the attic in a home in Marshfield, Wisconsin, in 1972. The garments include both Paris designer-bespoke fashions, and home-sewn designs, as well as items from exclusive American stores. The preservation, particularly of the oldest clothes, is amazing, and makes them truly museum-quality pieces.

Along with this, there is a display of contemporary clothing by Wisconsin designers, some of whom are “Project Runway” veterans. As might be expected, most of these are more art pieces than clothes (such as the bristly coat made out of zip ties, (“Breed Coat” by Alex Ulichny), but some of them Georgie would cheerfully worn to appropriate occasions, such as the elegant “Cotton Candy in the Rain,” by Peach Carr, and the “Kaleidoscope” dress by Lynne Dixon-Speller.

Continuing the clothing theme, there was also a room displaying vintage children’s clothes by Wisconsin based designer Florence Eiseman, which we found very interesting and showing a very handsome but practical aesthetic.
Tuesday afternoon, we went downtown to look at the collection of outdoor sculptures arranged along Wisconsin Avenue as part of the new Scupture Milwaukee event. Planned to be an annual thing, the exhibit has 22 sculptures from around the world installed along the city’s main street, from its east end (near the De Suvero “Sunrise” installation) west to N. 6th St.

We were fortunate to encounter some of the Downtown Guides who had just taken part in a kickoff event for the exhibition, who were able to give us a map and guide, as some of the pieces are set back from the street, and it’s possible to miss some of the smaller ones.
The pieces represent a wide variety of styles. Most are quite large, appropriate for outdoor settings.

Perhaps our favorite was one of the most spectacular pieces, “S2” by Santiago Calatrava, architect of the famous Milwaukee Art Museum wing. This dynamic piece is made up of interlocking metal sections, held together with tensioned cables. It reminds one of both a buzz-saw and a hurricane map, and looks striking and dangerous.

There’s also “Vortex” by Saint Clare Cemin, an inverted stainless steel tornado reaching for the sky; “Rose #2 (Icon Red)” by Will Ryman; “Immigrant Family,” by Tom Otterness, a charmingly cartoony grouping although ten feet tall in bronze; “Reina Mariana” by Manolo Valdes; and “Big Piney” by Deborah Butterfield, a very effective depiction of a horse as done in found branches (then also cast in bronze).

This was a very interesting exhibit, and gave us a good walk through our city on a lovely day. We hope this proves successful and indeed annual.

Profile

sinister_sigils

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  1 2345
67 89101112
131415 16171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags